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Get ready…A heat wave is coming to Northwest New Jersey! Check out the forecast and safety tips

HACKETTSTOWN, NJ (Warren County) – Grab your sunglasses and be prepared to jump in the nearest pool because it’s going to get hot in Northwest New Jersey this weekend and into early next week.

A large and expansive area of strong high pressure builds into the region today and will stick around for at least the next 5 days.This will suppress any risk for rain with dry weather in store through early next week. The main story of the forecast though is the significant, long-duration heat wave that is set to begin today as temps warm into the 90s, according to Hackettstown-based Weatherworks.

A dry Northwest  flow will keep humidity in check to start, but will gradually ramp up through the weekend. Temps will peak on Sunday and Monday as most places make a run at 100 degrees. Combined with full sunshine and high humidity, it will feel even hotter with peak heat indices well into the triple digits, WeatherWorks said.

Ready.gov provided these safety tips to stay safe during a heat wave:

  • Never leave a child, adult, or animal alone inside a vehicle on a warm day.
  • Find places with air conditioning. Libraries, shopping malls, and community centers can provide a cool place to take a break from the heat.
  • If you’re outside, find shade. Wear a hat wide enough to protect your face.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. If you or someone you care for is on a special diet, ask a doctor how best to accommodate it.
  • Do not use electric fans when the temperature outside is more than 95 degrees, as this could increase the risk of heat-related illness. Fans create air flow and a false sense of comfort, but do not reduce body temperature.
  • Avoid high-energy activities.
  • Check yourself, family members, and neighbors for signs of heat-related illness.

Know the signs of heat-related illness and the ways to respond to it:

HEAT CRAMPS

  • Signs: Muscle pains or spasms in the stomach, arms, or legs
  • Actions: Go to a cooler location. Remove excess clothing. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. Get medical help if cramps last more than an hour.

HEAT EXHAUSTION

  • Signs: Heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, or fainting
  • Actions: Go to an air-conditioned place and lie down. Loosen or remove clothing. Take a cool bath. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. Get medical help if symptoms get worse or last more than an hour.

HEAT STROKE

  • Signs: Extremely high body temperature (above 103 degrees) taken orally; red, hot, and dry skin with no sweat; rapid, strong pulse; dizziness; confusion; or unconsciousness
  • Actions: Call 911 or get the person to a hospital immediately. Cool down with whatever methods are available until medical help arrives.

According to the National Weather Service, even on mild days in the 70s, studies have shown that the temperature inside a parked vehicle can rapidly rise to a dangerous level for children, pets and even adults. Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate. The effects are more severe on children because their bodies warm at a faster rate than adults. A dark dashboard or carseat can quickly reach temperatures in the range of 180°F to over 200°F. These objects heat the adjacent air by conduction and convection and also give off long wave radiation, which then heats the air trapped inside a vehicle. Follow these tips to ensure your child’s safety.

  • Touch a child’s safety seat and safety belt before using it to ensure it’s not too hot before securing a child
  • Never leave a child unattended in a vehicle, even with the windows down, even for just a minute
  • Teach children not to play in, on, or around cars. They could accidentally trap themselves in a hot vehicle.
  • Always lock car doors and trunks–even at home–and keep keys out of children’s reach.
  • Always make sure children have left the car when you reach your destination. Don’t leave sleeping infants in the car ever.

FirstEnergy’s utilities offer some common-sense hot weather tips customers can follow to stay comfortable while using electricity wisely during this period of high demand:

  • Set thermostats as high as comfort will allow. Every degree a customer can increase the temperature in their home will result in using about 3 percent less energy during the hottest summer days.
  • During sunny weather, close drapes or blinds on windows facing the sun to prevent direct radiant heating from impacting interior temperatures.
  • Use fans – moving air cools skin faster, resulting in greater comfort on hot days.
  • Use a programmable thermostat to keep temperatures higher when no one is home, and to reduce the temperature before arrival back home.
  • Only operate window air conditioners when someone is in the room.
  • Keep refrigerators and freezers as full as possible. Frozen or cold items in the refrigerator help keep other items cool, reducing the amount of work the refrigerator has to do to maintain a lower temperature.
  • Close rooms that aren’t used regularly during the summer, and close the air conditioning vents in those rooms, as well.
  • Avoid using heat-producing appliances during the hottest hours of the day. The less heat produced at home, the less work the air conditioner will do.
  • Consider investing in ENERGY STAR® appliances or heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. FirstEnergy’s utilities may offer rebates on these purchases and tax deductions may apply, as well.
  • Check air conditioner and furnace fan filters. Clogged filters waste energy and money by forcing HVAC systems to work harder than necessary.

For more Northwest Jersey’s News, tune into 92.7FM, 104.7FM, 1510AM, wrnj.com or on the TuneIn app.

By: Jay Edwards Follow on Twitter | Like on Facebook

(Photo: Courtesy First Energy Corp.)