News Department

NJ Department of Agriculture releases instructional video on scraping spotted lanternfly egg masses

Department Encourages Residents To Find, Destroy Egg Masses Before Hatching

NEW JERSEY – New Jersey Department of Agriculture Secretary Douglas H. Fisher is encouraging New Jersey residents to help take part in eliminating Spotted Lanternfly egg masses before they hatch near the end of April or in early May.

Secretary Fisher and NJDA Plant Industry Division Director Joseph Zoltowski provide information and instructions on how to find and destroy the egg masses in a video released Wednesday.

“As the temperatures begin to warm, and more people are outside on their own properties we are asking them to look for and destroy Spotted Lanternfly egg masses,” Fisher said. “The more of these egg masses that can be eliminated now, means there will be less of this nuisance pest later in the spring and during the summer.”

Spotted Lanternfly egg masses hold between 30-50 eggs of the invasive species. One sign to look for to see where Spotted Lanternfly has been is a black sooty mold on a tree. The Spotted Lanternfly prefers the Tree of Heaven, which is common in New Jersey. While the Spotted Lanternfly is not a threat to humans or animals, it is known to feed on numerous types of vegetation.

NJDA and USDA crews have combined to treat more than 20,000 acres and have destroyed thousands of egg masses on nearly 600 properties throughout this past winter season.

The Spotted Lanternfly is native to Asia, but arrived in the U.S. in Berks County, Pa., on a shipment in 2014. The species has been advancing ever since, causing Pennsylvania to have 34 counties currently under quarantine. The New Jersey counties currently under quarantine are Warren, Hunterdon, Mercer, Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Salem, Somerset and is expected to expand.

(Photo: Spotted Lanternfly/Jay Edwards For WRNJ)

To learn more about the Spotted Lanternfly and what to do if you find them on your property, click here.

Jay Edwards

Born and raised in Northwest NJ, Jay has a degree in Communications and has had a life-long interest in local radio and various styles of music. Jay has held numerous jobs over the years such as stunt car driver, bartender, voice-over artist, traffic reporter (award winning), NY Yankee maintenance crewmember and peanut farm worker. His hobbies include mountain climbing, snowmobiling, cooking, performing stand-up comedy and he is an avid squirrel watcher. Jay has been a guest on America’s Morning Headquarters,program on The Weather Channel, and was interviewed by Sam Champion.

Related Articles

Back to top button